Featurecam Post Processor needed for denford triac atc 1990

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-=PAB=-
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Featurecam Post Processor needed for denford triac atc 1990

Post by -=PAB=- » Wed 21 Jun , 2006 18:56 pm

if anyone can help in suppling a post processor for featurecam or has an idea where to get one from- please let me know. cheers ..

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Post by Denford Admin » Thu 22 Jun , 2006 9:05 am

Not 100% sure about the older software, but I believe denfords have always favoured Fanuc style G-Code programming.

So, a standard, basic, Fanuc (say Fanuc 0-MC) post output should work fine (The basic codes will at least work G1,G2,G3,G4,G90,G91)

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post pro trouble

Post by -=PAB=- » Sat 09 Sep , 2006 9:45 am

some times i have trouble using my featurecam post processor - i have set the software to single quadrant circular moves (triac atc 1990) but i still have trouble - the only way i have been able to get it to work on machine is to limit the min arc move to 5 degrees. when put through the machine though it produces chamfered edges not rads???? i need to do smaller rads but the machine will not accept them when drip feeding- just stops??? any help?? would be grateful... regards, matt.......

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Post by Denford Admin » Sat 09 Sep , 2006 21:01 pm

Can you try configure the post to convert arcs into linears ?

It could be that the old Triac controller (is it a PNC3 ?) has a lower resolution with arcs than with linears, so you could get finer small "arcs" with a load of linear moves.
MrMagoo will probably know whats happening here though

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Post by -=PAB=- » Sat 09 Sep , 2006 22:43 pm

it is pnc3 - i could do the whole thing in linear moves but that would take forever on the most stupid nc control i have ever used. no read ahead function= poor component finish and dimension, excessive tool wear and long anoying delays between each line.. i know it was 1990 but whoever thought of this control even for training purposes should be sacked or better still shot...

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Post by Triac whizz » Sun 10 Sep , 2006 20:12 pm

OOOooooo sounds like fighting talk! :lol:
poor component finish and dimension, excessive tool wear
No chance it might be your tooling then?

Component finish is down to speed and feed and a bloody good sharp cutter (preferably tipped) oh and the gib strips adjusted correctly - have you checked for movement with a dial guage?

Actually the PNC3 was way before 1990 around 1983 I believe, though I'm sure Mr Magoo will enlighten us

If you look at NE's page http://www.nee-controls.com/pnc3.html you will see that
At the heart of the system was a powerful NEE designed computer
So I can't see that as being the problem :lol:

But on the other hand I junked my box a long time ago. The stepper drivers are only single step (opposed to microstep) which doesn't help and it will only hold 500 lines of code - 1000 was an option I believe and It doesn't remember any offsets when you turn it off.

Ah yes the worlds moved on since 1983. Think back what computer did you have on your desk in 1983 - It was probably called a typewriter! :lol:

Retrofit it with Geckos and Mach software if you want performance or buy one with a Fanuc control. I can tell you it's not the machine frame design that's at fault - I can slam a 18mm U-drill into ali at 3000rpm and 200mm/min without problem (Acutally the book says 6k rpm and 500 but Denfords not being forward thinking enough didn't make the drive go fast enough nor enough gee gees (HP) :lol:

So basically expect Sinclair spectrum performance from it :?
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Post by Denford Admin » Mon 11 Sep , 2006 9:08 am

-=PAB=-

Don't be too harsh - TriacWhizz is right, the control has been around for a lot longer than 1990 (although its apparently still been used - with the same quadrant arc limitation - by another UK educational supplier)

If you want to get any help from the old timers, then try not use comments like
whoever thought of this control even for training purposes should be sacked or better still shot
- they may well have been involved in the spec of this control and I know I'd be offended :x

When you look at what computers were around at the time, then you'll appreciate that it did a pretty good job:

PC's circa 1984:
Image

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Post by Triac whizz » Mon 11 Sep , 2006 11:38 am

Cor! are they XP ready? :lol: :lol:
Are they upgradable?

Don't they all look like typewriters without the paper slot

I remember back then we had one of those amstrad things in the office somebody broke in and just stole the keyboard thinking that was the computer!!

Did you know that the word typewriter only uses the top line of keys on a keyboard? something you never knew you wanted to know..
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Post by -=PAB=- » Mon 11 Sep , 2006 13:24 pm

the computers you listed which i have had most of - were minimum of 8bit and could hold much more than 500 lines of code- they could also process more than 1 line at time- im not concerned with the construction of the machine which seems to be sound more, the control and the annoying delays- if you get dwell while machining you will get excesssive tool wear and inaccuracy- it is not down mearly to good tooling. i've programmed most of those computers and have worked with cnc machines for 20years- if the original control was made i 1983 then 1990 machines should have been upgraded- computers then were far better. 1Ghz!!!!!

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Post by Denford Admin » Mon 11 Sep , 2006 16:39 pm

1Ghz in 1990 ??? - windows 3.0 was just getting off the ground - are you thinking of 2000 :?
1996 Intel releases the 200 MHz P6.


1990 - Microsoft releases Windows 3.0 a completely new version of Microsoft Windows. The version will sell more than 3 million copies in one year.
-probably running on 33Mhz 286 processors

taken from:
http://www.xmission.com/~comphope/history/19902000.htm

Anyway, the thing is you can't expect too much from an "ancient" control, just make the best of it - lots of others on here will advice you on how to upgrade the drives / electronics and use a fast PC to run it.
Hopefully Magoo will know why the small rads are coming out as chamfers, but I wouldn't be surprised if that isn't just how it is :roll:

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Post by Triac whizz » Mon 11 Sep , 2006 17:20 pm

Ah well yes, PAB, but don't forget who these machines were aimed at - The educational establishments.

The purpose of the machines was to demonstate how bits were made in the real world, the fact that it went slower was probably a good idea as it gave them more time to hit the emergency stop :lol:

My Fanuc Triac despite saying in the bumf it had 5m/s rapids was only set to 2m/s in the parameters!

It didn't matter that it wasn't very good with arcs (sadly) as the budget probablt only stretched to foam and didn't sh*g the cutters if the kiddies had done the code umm, "creatively." I doubt if schools have a vernier let alone a mike.

I would guess that by 1990 your machine was either quite cheap or Denfords were on a nice little earner with it :)

Sadly as you know by todays stardards the control is a umm how should I say it... "dated" and the best thing for performance is to retrofit it with the likes of Mach3 & geckos or get a Fanuc version...

Maybe Denfords do a good part exchange deal :lol:
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Post by Mr Magoo » Thu 14 Sep , 2006 10:56 am

It sounds like PAB is kicking himself for not doing his homework before buying the machine. You don't let your kids loose in a Porche when you're teaching them to drive...

Which is one of the advantages of fitting stepper motors - feed into the job without the spindle running and the worst you can do is break the cutter, not the drive system.

Like Triac Whizz says, Denford have fitted Fanuc, Heidenhain and other controls to their machines too, but as the old saying goes, "you gets what you pays for...."

:shock:

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